Labor History

This Week in Labor History: 5/13 - 5/19

labor history

This Week in Labor History: 5/13 - 5/19

Western Federation of Miners formed in Butte, Mont. Milwaukee brewery workers begin 10-week strike. U.S. Supreme Court rules in favor of Samuel Gompers. A. Philip Randolph dies. Oklahoma jury finds for the estate of atomic worker Karen Silkwood. 31 dockworkers are killed, 350 workers and others are injured when four barges carrying 467 tons of ammunition blow up at South Amboy, N.J.

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This Week in Labor History: 5/6 - 5/12

labor history

This Week in Labor History: 5/6 - 5/12

Four hundred Black women working as tobacco stemmers walk off the job in a spontaneous revolt against poor working conditions. Two die, 20 are injured in “Bloody Tuesday” as strikebreakers attempt to run San Francisco streetcars during a strike by operators. Some 12,000 Steelworker-represented workers at Goodyear Tire & Rubber win an 18-day strike for improved wages and job security. Legendary Western Federation of Miners leader William “Big Bill” Haywood goes on trial for murder. Nationwide railway strike begins at Pullman, Ill. U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents raid the Agriprocessors, Inc. slaughterhouse and meat packing plant.

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This Week in Labor History: April 29 - May 5

labor history

This Week in Labor History: April 29 - May 5

Coxey’s Army of 500 unemployed civil war veterans reaches Washington, D.C. Explosion at the Everettville mine kills 109. Mary Harris “Mother” Jones born in County Cork, Ireland. President Herbert Hoover declares that the stock market crash six months earlier was just a "temporary setback." Pete Seeger, folksinger and union activist, born in Patterson, N.Y. Italian-American anarchists Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti are arrested.

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This Week in Labor History: 4/22 - 4/28

labor history

This Week in Labor History: 4/22 - 4/28

Songwriter, musician and activist Hazel Dickens dies. An eight-story building housing garment factories in Dhaka, Bangladesh collapses, killing 1,129 workers and injuring 2,515. The Reverend Ralph David Abernathy and 100 others are arrested while picketing a Charleston, S.C., hospital in a demand for union recognition. On the orders of President Roosevelt, the U.S. Army seizes the Chicago headquarters of the unionized Montgomery Ward & Co. after management defies the National Labor Relations Board.

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This Week in Labor History: 4/15 - 4/21

labor history

This Week in Labor History: 4/15 - 4/21

A. Philip Randolph born. 20,000 global justice activists blockade Washington, D.C., meetings of the World Bank and IMF. After a four-week boycott led by Rev. Adam Clayton Powell Jr., bus companies in New York City agree to hire 200 Black drivers and mechanics. An American domestic terrorist’s bomb destroys the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City. Walter Reuther shot as he is eating dinner at his kitchen table, permanently impairing his right arm. Mary Doyle Keefe, who in 1943 posed as “Rosie the Riveter” for famed painter Norman Rockwell, dies at age 92.

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