Labor History

This Week in Labor History: 3/11 - 3/17

labor history

This Week in Labor History: 3/11 - 3/17

Luddites smash 63 “labor saving” textile machines. The first tunnel under the Hudson River is completed. A four-month UAW strike at General Motors ends with a new contract. The movie Salt of the Earth opens. Staffers at San Francisco progressive rock station KMPX-FM strike.

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This Week in Labor History: 3/4 - 3/10

labor history

This Week in Labor History: 3/4 - 3/10

President Franklin D. Roosevelt names Frances Perkins to be secretary of labor. Soldiers shot down Crispus Attucks, a Black colonist, then others, in what became known as the Boston Massacre. Joe Hill’s song “There is Power in a Union” appears in Little Red Song Book. IWW founder and labor organizer Lucy Parsons dies. The Norris-LaGuardia Anti-Injunction Act took effect on this day. U.S. Congress begins its 100 days of enacting New Deal legislation. 

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This Week in Labor History: 2/25 - 3/3

labor history

This Week in Labor History: 2/25 - 3/3

100,000 strong rallied at the Wisconsin state Capitol in protest of crippled public employee bargaining rights. Bethlehem Steel workers strike for union recognition. Birth of John Steinbeck. The International Association of Fire Fighters (IAFF) is organized. After five years of labor by 21,000 workers, 112 of whom were killed on the job, the Hoover Dam (Boulder Dam) is completed. Postal workers granted 8-hour day. The Davis-Bacon Act takes effect.

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This Week in Labor History: 2/18 - 2/24

labor history

This Week in Labor History: 2/18 - 2/24

One of the first American labor newspapers, The Man, is published in New York City. Farm Labor Organizing Committee signs agreement with Campbell Soup Co., ending 7-year boycott. Rally for unemployed becomes major confrontation in Philadelphia, 18 arrested for demanding jobs. United Farm Workers of America granted a charter by the AFL-CIO. W.E.B. DuBois, educator and civil rights activist, born. Woody Guthrie wrote “This Land Is Your Land” following a frigid trip—partially by hitchhiking, partially by rail—from California to Manhattan.

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This Week in Labor History: 2/11 - 2/17

labor history

This Week in Labor History: 2/11 - 2/17

Mary Harris “Mother” Jones is arrested while leading a protest of conditions in West Virginia mines. Abolitionist Frederick Douglass born into slavery near Easton, Md. 12,000 Hollywood writers returned to work following a largely successful three-month strike. Jimmy Hoffa born in Brazil, Ind. Susan B. Anthony, suffragist, abolitionist, labor activist, born in Adams, Mass. Diamond Mine disaster in Braidwood, Ill. Sixty-three sit-down strikers, demanding recognition of their union, are tear-gassed and driven from two Fansteel Metallurgical Corp. plants in Chicago.

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