Labor History

This Week in Labor History: 12/31 - 1/6

labor history

This Week in Labor History: 12/31 - 1/6

United Mine Workers reformer Joseph "Jock" Yablonski, his wife and daughter are murdered by hit men hired by union president Tony Boyle.  Emancipation Proclamation signed.  John L. Lewis is elected president of the United Mine Workers.  Palmer Raids: 4,000 foreign-born labor activists arrested.  Wobbly Tom Mooney tried in San Francisco for Preparedness Day bombing.  Iowa's Farmers Holiday Association threaten to lynch banking representatives who institute foreclosure proceedings during the Great Depression.  Construction of the Golden Gate Bridge begins.  Eight thousand workers strike at Youngstown Sheet & Tube.

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This Week in Labor History: 12/24 - 12/30

labor history

This Week in Labor History: 12/24 - 12/30

Seventy-two copper miners’ children die in panic caused by a company stooge who shouted “fire.”  A dynamite bomb destroys a portion of the Llewellyn Ironworks.  Knights of Labor founded.  President Roosevelt seizes the railroads to avert a nationwide strike.  The coffee percolator is patented by James H. Mason.  Country music legend Hank Williams attends what is to be his last musicians’ union meeting.  GM sit-down strike spreads to Flint.

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This Week in Labor History: 12/17 - 12/23

labor history

This Week in Labor History:  12/17 - 12/23

General Motors announces it is closing 21 North American plants.  An explosion in the Darr Mine in Westmoreland Co., Pa., kills 239.  TWU Local 100 President Roger Toussaint jailed for ten days.  Slater’s thread-spinning factory goes into production in Pawtucket, R.I., launching the Industrial Revolution in America.  Twenty-one Chicago firefighters died when a building collapsed as they were fighting a huge blaze at the Union Stock Yards.  Construction workers top out the North Tower of the World Trade Center at 1,368 feet, making it the tallest building in the world.

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This Week in Labor History: 12/10 - 12/16

labor history

This Week in Labor History: 12/10 - 12/16

Cesar Chavez jailed for 14 days.  Black farmers organize the Colored Farmers’ National Alliance and Cooperative Union in Houston County, Texas.  A U.S. immigration sweep of six Swift meat plants results in arrests of undocumented workers.  Samuel Gompers dies.  Machinists end a 69-day walkout at Boeing.  "Amazon Army" goes from mine to mine attacking non-striking miners in Pittsburg, KS coal fields.  New York City’s Majestic Theater becomes first in the U.S. to employ women ushers.

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This Week in Labor History: 12/3 - 12/9

labor history

This Week in Labor History: 12/3 - 12/9

Canada’s Quebec Bridge opens.  At least four thousand die and as many as 20,000, in one of the largest industrial disasters on record, in Bhopal, India, when poisonous methyl isocyanate was released into the atmosphere.  President Roosevelt announces the end of the Works Progress Administration.  Unionists John T. and James B. McNamara are sentenced to 15 years and life, respectively, after confessing to dynamiting the Los Angeles Times building.  The Washington Monument is completed in Washington, D.C.  Heywood Broun born in New York City.  114-day newspaper strike begins in NYC.  Ratification of a new labor agreement at Titan Tire ends the longest strike in the history of the U.S. tire industry.

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