United Apart: Gender and the Rise of Craft Unionism
Unionist

United Apart: Gender and the Rise of Craft Unionism

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By Ileen DeVault

At the turn of the twentieth century, American factory workers were often segregated by sex—males did heavier, dirtier and better paid work while women might be employed in a separate area performing related, lighter work. Men might cut bolts of fabric, for example, while women stitched cuffs onto sleeves. Workers in some industries realized that, because their jobs were so intertwined, women had to support men, and men had to support women, if any job action was to be successful. DeVault explores the connections between worker solidarity and individual considerations of skill, gender, race/ethnicity. 244 pages softcover


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